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Group show: ABSTRACTION AND THE HUMAN FIGURE IN CAM´S BRITISH ART COLLECTION (over)

21 January 2010 until 18 April 2010
  ABSTRACTION AND THE HUMAN FIGURE IN CAM´S BRITISH ART COLLECTION
 
  Centro de Arte Moderna - CAM - Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian

Centro de Arte Moderna - CAM - Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
Rua Dr. Nicolau de Bettencourt
1050-078 Lisbon
Portugal (city map)

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tel +351 217 - 82 34 74 / 21 782 3483
www.camjap.gulbenkian.org


A selection of 80 works from CAM's British Art Collection, devoted to the theme of abstraction and the figuration of the human body returns to floor 1 more than ten years after the last comprehensive exhibition of works from CAM's British collection - The Treasure Island - held in 1997.

This exhibition has been thought in relation to the exhibition Jane and Louise Wilson - Suspending Time, and offers a route through the main groups of artists and works bought during the busiest period of acquisition, between 1959 and 1965.

Seven areas are arranged according to different themes: British constructivism, which developed around the guiding figure of Victor Pasmore [a paradigmatic sculpture (1989) by Rachel Whiteread can be seen near this group]; the landscape abstraction of St. Ives, the Cornish town where Barbara Hepworth, Ben Nicholson and Naum Gabo went to live in the 1939 (Gabo only stayed until 1946), giving rise to a group of artists that had a marked impact on post-war British art; pop art, which offered various opportunities to incorporate mass visual culture and to fuse abstract and figurative language; op art, which worked with sophisticated perceptual questions centring on the relation between the emitter and the receiver; the London-based group Situation, which was interested in formulating a more urban abstraction, with a strong, architecture-related physical involvement; and the figuration of artists linked to the London School, together with the painting of the young Scottish artists who, during the 1980s, became known as the Glasgow Renaissance. Finally these groups are joined by a nucleus that associates works by recent artists such as Craigie Horsfield or Antony Gormley, and works created in the 1990s by artists such as Richard Hamilton, a key figure in the first generation of British pop art, or the duo Gilbert & George, whose work has left an indelible impression on British art since the 1970s.

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